Tag Archives: police officer

Bachelor of Law Enforcement Studies Justice & Public Safety Division Justice Institute of British Columbia School of Criminal Justice & Security

Be the one keeping communities safe


Sebastien Therrien’s pursuit of a career in policing led him to JIBC. Thanks to his JIBC degree, he’s now enrolled in graduate studies to further his education. (Story by Wanda Chow / Photo by Jimmy Jeong)

 

Sebastien Therrien’s pursuit of a career in policing led him to the Justice Institute of British Columbia (JIBC) and now his JIBC degree is helping him expand his career opportunities as he pursues a graduate degree.

Growing up in Quebec, Sebastien, now 27, always wanted to be a police officer, a career where he could make a difference while working directly with the public.

That determination was strengthened after he graduated high school and joined the Canadian Forces Army Reserves, while completing a diploma in Police Foundations at La Cité Collégiale in Ottawa. It was at La Cité where he learned of a new agreement between that school and JIBC, where he could apply his education towards completion of JIBC’s Bachelor of Law Enforcement Studies (BLES) degree.

Sebastien says his JIBC education helped open his mind on many subjects, particularly the history of Indigenous peoples in Canada, how they were treated and how that continues to impact that community today.

“In high school I cannot remember learning about that and it’s so important to learn about it. That’s what struck me, like wow, I’m 25, 26 years old and I’m just learning about this?”

read more »

Law Enforcement Studies Diploma Police Academy

Officer aims to draw on own experience to be role model and help others

Just as she was once made to feel safe by police officers in her time of need, Const. Shauntelle Nichols wants to help others the same way. A graduate of JIBC’s Law Enforcement Studies Diploma program she is now an officer with the Saanich Police Department. (Story and photo by Wanda Chow)

 

When Shauntelle Nichols needed help, the police were there for her. Today she’s a police officer herself, ready to be there for others in need.

For the last several years, Shauntelle has drawn on her experience of officers helping make her feel safe to motivate and inspire her in her studies and efforts to be hired by a local police department.

“Because really, that’s what policing is. You’re at your worst day, somebody’s coming to help you. That’s what’s inspiring to me. I want to be that person [to make others feel safe]. And I see a lot of women, Aboriginal women, Aboriginal youth, in stressful and horrible relationships. They don’t know how to get out and sometimes all it takes is somebody listening, being supportive and being strong for you and guiding you in the right direction.”

It wasn’t long before her personal experience pointed her in the direction of the Justice Institute of British Columbia (JIBC) where she applied to the Law Enforcement Studies Diploma (LESD) program.

“I remember the day I got my acceptance letter I cried my eyes out because I was so happy to be going to this program. It’s the top public safety institution in BC. It’s well known and I knew that if I got in here and I worked as hard as I could it would give me a strong, strong reference to apply to police departments.”

read more »

Justice Institute of British Columbia Law Enforcement Studies Diploma

LESD grad aims to draw on refugee experience

Mansoor Sahak becomes a police officer to give back to Canada for taking in his family as refugees. (Story by Wanda Chow / Photo by Richard Chu)

 

Mansoor Sahak knew he wanted to be a police officer ever since volunteering at a community policing station and attending the New Westminster Police Department’s Student Police Academy.

He always figured it was because policing is exciting and different from most careers. But eventually, he uncovered a deeper reason. It’s because he feels privileged to live in Canada.

He was too young to remember much of it, but his parents have told him stories. Of how his family fled Afghanistan when the Taliban took power and the war started. How they left almost everything behind. How they escaped to Pakistan where his family of seven shared a home with three other families, all relatives.

“My parents always talk about it. They always wanted to go back to Afghanistan, to go back home. It was the home we grew up in but it was destroyed, there was nothing left of it.”

Mansoor, 22, does remember how, at age nine, he and his family came to Canada as refugees, knowing no English, having to rebuild their lives again. But always his parents would talk about the destruction taking place in their native country, and what continues to be lost.

“You realize that was you at one point, that could have been you,” he said. “But you made it, it’s literally a lottery ticket for my family to come out here.”

He hopes one day to become a police officer to give back to the country that took in his family. To help him to that end, he completed a Law Enforcement Studies Diploma at the Justice Institute of British Columbia (JIBC).  read more »

Justice Institute of British Columbia Office of Indigenization

Justice and public safety program for Aboriginal students a lifesaver

2016_11nov29_aboriginalstudentprofile_jessiejensen-650x300-b
Jessie Jensen is a student in the Justice and Public Safety Certificate program. In addition to fuelling her dream of becoming an RCMP officer, the CPR training in the First Responder course already helped her save a life. (Story and photo by Wanda Chow)

 

When Jessie Jensen enrolled in a new program at the Justice Institute of British Columbia (JIBC), she saw it as a way to gain new skills and take steps toward a new career.

She never dreamed her courses would help her save another life so soon.

Jessie, 20, lives with her parents who care for a six-month-old foster baby. Recently, the infant girl had a fever that spiked before she suddenly stopped breathing.

Despite having only just completed her JIBC First Responder course, it was Jessie who performed CPR and got the baby breathing again before paramedics arrived.

“You don’t think you’re going to use these things right away,” she said of the course, just days after the incident. “It was the scariest moment of my life.”

The First Responder course is part of JIBC’s Justice and Public Safety Certificate program for Aboriginal learners which started in January 2016 in conjunction with Native Education College (NEC). The program, from tuition to textbooks, is fully funded by government through the BC Ministry of Advanced Education, the Employment Services and Supports (ESS) stream of the Canada-BC Job Fund Agreement, and Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada. To be eligible, students must identify as being of First Nation, Metis or Inuit heritage and have an interest in justice and public safety careers. read more »

Bachelor of Law Enforcement Studies Justice & Public Safety Division Justice Institute of British Columbia Law Enforcement Studies Diploma

JIBC exchange programs give global perspective to students

dianahon-waterford_650x300

Diana Hon joined students in enjoying the Irish countryside while on a JIBC exchange to the Waterford Institute of Technology in 2013. Being a foreigner in Ireland helped her relate to newcomers she encounters in her current job as a police officer in Greater Vancouver.  (Story by Wanda Chow)

 

Diana Hon knows a thing or two about being a stranger in a strange land.

But having grown up Asian in a major Canadian city, it’s not like she wasn’t used to the diversity. Rather, for Hon, a graduate of the Law Enforcement Studies Diploma (LESD) program at the Justice Institute of British Columbia (JIBC), her eye-opening moments of cultural differences came while participating in a JIBC foreign exchange program. In Ireland.

“The most difficult part for me was understanding the accent because the Irish accent is so thick over there,” she said with a laugh of her time studying at the Waterford Institute of Technology (WIT) in the fall of 2013. “They’d say ‘the pub’ but I would hear ‘the Pope.’ ”

Add to that the fact that the only other Asian people she met were other international students at her WIT student residence, and Hon definitely felt far from home.

Since January 2013, 10 JIBC LESD students have spent their last semester on an academic exchange at WIT in Ireland. The program helps students gain an international perspective of law enforcement and learn about the different opportunities and challenges faced by those working in law enforcement in other parts of the world. The JIBC Foundation, the Peter and Joanne Brown Foundation and the Irving K. Barber British Columbia Scholarship Society, administered by the Victoria Foundation, generously provide financial support for students participating in this unique experience.

read more »

Justice & Public Safety Division Justice Institute of British Columbia Law Enforcement Studies Diploma

Robbery set LESD grad on path to policing

2016_09sept6_mateen_rc-1-650x300Being a victim of crime helped by police inspired Mateen Aminie to go into policing himself. He credits JIBC’s Law Enforcement Studies Diploma program for helping him get hired recently by a local police department. (Story by Wanda Chow / Photo by Richard Chu)

 

Const. Mateen Aminie was just 14 when an act of violence set him on a career path to help others.

By then, the teen had already had more upheaval in his life than many encounter in a lifetime. His family had fled their native Afghanistan when he was a baby, relocating to Pakistan before eventually emigrating to Canada years later when he was 13.

It was good timing for him, he said, since by that age, he was firmly ensconced in his native culture, able to speak fluent Farsi and Dari, and could adapt to a new language and culture in his new life in Canada.

Things were going well in his first year in Canada until he was attacked while heading home from a job at a fast-food outlet in Surrey. A group of thugs knocked him unconscious, hitting him in the head with a bat and kicking him in the face, before robbing him. A passing cab driver witnessed the incident and called Surrey RCMP.

When police arrived, they offered him the help of victim services, and generally they showed they cared. This was very different from his experience in Pakistan where most people don’t like or trust police.

“Before I came to Canada I knew police were different here, but I didn’t know how different,” said Mateen, now 20. “They caught the guys who did it within an hour. That was really cool. That kind of thing doesn’t happen over there in Pakistan.”

read more »

Bachelor of Law Enforcement Studies Justice & Public Safety Division School of Criminal Justice & Security

JIBC law enforcement degree helps aspiring police officers stand out

2016_lacite_students1-edited2b_rc-650x300Charles Payette, Sabastien Therrien, and Sabastien Houle are among graduates from Ontario’s largest French-language college completing their Bachelor’s degree at JIBC (Photo & story by Richard Chu)

 

Charles Payette decided to move across the country to complete JIBC’s Bachelor of Law Enforcement Studies (BLES) program. He wasn’t the only one.

Last fall, four graduates from Ontario’s largest French-language college, La Cité collégiale, moved to New Westminster from their hometowns in Quebec to continue their education at JIBC. They first heard about the BLES program from their Dean at La Cité when JIBC and La Cité signed a Memorandum of Understanding to expand educational opportunities for students. As graduates of La Cité’s applied Police Foundations Diploma (Techniques des Services Policiers), each student was interested in continuing their education with a unique program that would help them stand out in the highly competitive law enforcement recruitment process.

“A lot of students go into criminology,” said Charles. “But this is different. Rather than look like all the other police applicants, I can say I have a degree from the Justice Institute of British Columbia in law enforcement studies. It’s not something a lot of other applicants will have.”

read more »

Justice & Public Safety Division Law Enforcement Studies Diploma School of Criminal Justice & Security

JIBC graduates get a global perspective in policing

James Copping in Ireland (2013)James Copping, a recent JIBC graduate, had the opportunity to complete part of his studies as an exchange student in Ireland (Submitted photo)

 

For James Copping and Diana Hon, completing the Law Enforcement Studies Diploma (LESD) didn’t just give them an advantage in a career in law enforcement. It broadened their perspective of the world and policing.

The two students had the opportunity to spend their last semester in 2013 in Ireland at the Waterford Institute of Technology (WIT). read more »