Tag Archives: Police Academy

Law Enforcement Studies Diploma Police Academy

Officer aims to draw on own experience to be role model and help others

Just as she was once made to feel safe by police officers in her time of need, Const. Shauntelle Nichols wants to help others the same way. A graduate of JIBC’s Law Enforcement Studies Diploma program she is now an officer with the Saanich Police Department. (Story and photo by Wanda Chow)

 

When Shauntelle Nichols needed help, the police were there for her. Today she’s a police officer herself, ready to be there for others in need.

For the last several years, Shauntelle has drawn on her experience of officers helping make her feel safe to motivate and inspire her in her studies and efforts to be hired by a local police department.

“Because really, that’s what policing is. You’re at your worst day, somebody’s coming to help you. That’s what’s inspiring to me. I want to be that person [to make others feel safe]. And I see a lot of women, Aboriginal women, Aboriginal youth, in stressful and horrible relationships. They don’t know how to get out and sometimes all it takes is somebody listening, being supportive and being strong for you and guiding you in the right direction.”

It wasn’t long before her personal experience pointed her in the direction of the Justice Institute of British Columbia (JIBC) where she applied to the Law Enforcement Studies Diploma (LESD) program.

“I remember the day I got my acceptance letter I cried my eyes out because I was so happy to be going to this program. It’s the top public safety institution in BC. It’s well known and I knew that if I got in here and I worked as hard as I could it would give me a strong, strong reference to apply to police departments.”

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Justice & Public Safety Division Justice Institute of British Columbia Law Enforcement Studies Diploma

Robbery set LESD grad on path to policing

2016_09sept6_mateen_rc-1-650x300Being a victim of crime helped by police inspired Mateen Aminie to go into policing himself. He credits JIBC’s Law Enforcement Studies Diploma program for helping him get hired recently by a local police department. (Story by Wanda Chow / Photo by Richard Chu)

 

Const. Mateen Aminie was just 14 when an act of violence set him on a career path to help others.

By then, the teen had already had more upheaval in his life than many encounter in a lifetime. His family had fled their native Afghanistan when he was a baby, relocating to Pakistan before eventually emigrating to Canada years later when he was 13.

It was good timing for him, he said, since by that age, he was firmly ensconced in his native culture, able to speak fluent Farsi and Dari, and could adapt to a new language and culture in his new life in Canada.

Things were going well in his first year in Canada until he was attacked while heading home from a job at a fast-food outlet in Surrey. A group of thugs knocked him unconscious, hitting him in the head with a bat and kicking him in the face, before robbing him. A passing cab driver witnessed the incident and called Surrey RCMP.

When police arrived, they offered him the help of victim services, and generally they showed they cared. This was very different from his experience in Pakistan where most people don’t like or trust police.

“Before I came to Canada I knew police were different here, but I didn’t know how different,” said Mateen, now 20. “They caught the guys who did it within an hour. That was really cool. That kind of thing doesn’t happen over there in Pakistan.”

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Centre for Aboriginal Programs & Services Justice Institute of British Columbia Office of Indigenization

JIBC staff and faculty gain lifelong learning opportunities working with Aboriginal students

2016 NAD CollageAn Aboriginal hoop dancer performs at National Aboriginal Day celebrations held at the Justice Institute of British Columbia recently. JIBC staff and faculty marked the occasion by recounting personal and professional lessons they learned from working with Aboriginal students and communities. (Photos by Richard Chu / Story by Wanda Chow)

 

When it comes to working with Aboriginal students and communities, staff and faculty at Justice Institute of British Columbia (JIBC) find the lessons go both ways.

That was the common theme among speakers at this year’s National Aboriginal Day event held June 21 in JIBC’s recently-opened Aboriginal Gathering Place at the New Westminster Campus.

“National Aboriginal Day is always a special occasion at JIBC,” said Dr. Jeffrey Schiffer, Director of the Office of Indigenization. “This year, we decided it was a great opportunity to share some of the ways the education we’re providing is helping to build capacity within Aboriginal communities, and strengthen relationships in the spirit of truth and reconciliation.”

Bridget Malcom, JIBC’s Aboriginal Student Recruiter & Advisor, shared her story of how her work at the Institute has put her in touch with her own Aboriginal heritage. Growing up, she lived with her father in New Westminster, with little awareness of her mother’s Aboriginal culture. After working at JIBC planning events and ceremonies with local First Nations and their Elders as part of her role, Malcom said there’s been no shortage of opportunities to learn more about her Aboriginal roots. She notes that exposure to her cultural heritage has only enhanced her work and commitment to assist JIBC Aboriginal learners. read more »