Tag Archives: law enforcement

Bachelor of Law Enforcement Studies Justice & Public Safety Division Justice Institute of British Columbia School of Criminal Justice & Security

Be the one keeping communities safe


Sebastien Therrien’s pursuit of a career in policing led him to JIBC. Thanks to his JIBC degree, he’s now enrolled in graduate studies to further his education. (Story by Wanda Chow / Photo by Jimmy Jeong)

 

Sebastien Therrien’s pursuit of a career in policing led him to the Justice Institute of British Columbia (JIBC) and now his JIBC degree is helping him expand his career opportunities as he pursues a graduate degree.

Growing up in Quebec, Sebastien, now 27, always wanted to be a police officer, a career where he could make a difference while working directly with the public.

That determination was strengthened after he graduated high school and joined the Canadian Forces Army Reserves, while completing a diploma in Police Foundations at La Cité Collégiale in Ottawa. It was at La Cité where he learned of a new agreement between that school and JIBC, where he could apply his education towards completion of JIBC’s Bachelor of Law Enforcement Studies (BLES) degree.

Sebastien says his JIBC education helped open his mind on many subjects, particularly the history of Indigenous peoples in Canada, how they were treated and how that continues to impact that community today.

“In high school I cannot remember learning about that and it’s so important to learn about it. That’s what struck me, like wow, I’m 25, 26 years old and I’m just learning about this?”

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Bachelor of Law Enforcement Studies Justice & Public Safety Division Justice Institute of British Columbia Law Enforcement Studies Diploma

JIBC experience life-changing for law enforcement degree grad

Ramandeep Randhawa says his JIBC Law Enforcement Studies instructors went “above and beyond” in helping him achieve his career goals. (Story and photo by Wanda Chow)

 

Like many kids, Ramandeep Randhawa grew up wanting to be a police officer.

For much of his life, though, he was also overweight.

That has changed for the better, he says, with much thanks to his instructors at the Justice Institute of British Columbia (JIBC).

As a teenager, Ramandeep attended a youth cadet program and the New Westminster Police Department Student Police Academy which helped him confirm he wanted to work in law enforcement. He set about working towards his goal by spending two years studying criminology at a local university.

Then he learned about JIBC’s Law Enforcement Studies Diploma (LESD) program, and how it is specifically geared towards those interested in policing and other law enforcement careers.

When he started the LESD program over four years ago, he weighed 325 pounds. By the time he graduated with a Bachelor of Law Enforcement Studies (BLES) four years later, he had lost 125 pounds.

His instructors put him on a simple diet plan and workout routine and kept him accountable.

“They went above and beyond,” Ramandeep said. “They actually care and want to see you be successful.”

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Justice Institute of British Columbia Law Enforcement Studies Diploma

LESD grad aims to draw on refugee experience

Mansoor Sahak becomes a police officer to give back to Canada for taking in his family as refugees. (Story by Wanda Chow / Photo by Richard Chu)

 

Mansoor Sahak knew he wanted to be a police officer ever since volunteering at a community policing station and attending the New Westminster Police Department’s Student Police Academy.

He always figured it was because policing is exciting and different from most careers. But eventually, he uncovered a deeper reason. It’s because he feels privileged to live in Canada.

He was too young to remember much of it, but his parents have told him stories. Of how his family fled Afghanistan when the Taliban took power and the war started. How they left almost everything behind. How they escaped to Pakistan where his family of seven shared a home with three other families, all relatives.

“My parents always talk about it. They always wanted to go back to Afghanistan, to go back home. It was the home we grew up in but it was destroyed, there was nothing left of it.”

Mansoor, 22, does remember how, at age nine, he and his family came to Canada as refugees, knowing no English, having to rebuild their lives again. But always his parents would talk about the destruction taking place in their native country, and what continues to be lost.

“You realize that was you at one point, that could have been you,” he said. “But you made it, it’s literally a lottery ticket for my family to come out here.”

He hopes one day to become a police officer to give back to the country that took in his family. To help him to that end, he completed a Law Enforcement Studies Diploma at the Justice Institute of British Columbia (JIBC).  read more »

Corrections & Court Services Division Justice Institute of British Columbia School of Criminal Justice & Security Sheriff Academy

JIBC grad meets law enforcement goal as sheriff

harry_dhillon_650x300Harry Dhillon is about to meet his goal of working in law enforcement as he prepares to graduate from the Sheriff Academy at JIBC. (Story and photo by Wanda Chow) 

 

Harry Dhillon’s path into law enforcement was a circuitous one.

Since high school, he had always wanted to get into that line of work and, knowing there are many avenues out there, always made a point to keep his options open.

“I just wanted to be a positive role model in the community. I like problem-solving and helping people.”

At 18, Harry walked into an armed forces recruitment centre.

“Before I knew it, I was recruited with the army reserves with the military police. My very first uniform.”

He trained with them for seven years, the part-time gig providing the opportunity to travel around Canada and the U.S. In between stints with the reserves he studied criminology in university.

“The army really helped build my character, it kind of introduced discipline into my life.”

At 22, he became an auxiliary constable with Surrey RCMP, a volunteer position which gave him a taste for local law enforcement and gave him experience interacting with the public at community events.

Then, at 24, he joined the BC Public Service as a corrections officer.

“That’s where I had the chance to really build on my communication skills,” he said. “Your leadership and communication skills really play a key role in controlling and de-escalating situations.”

It was while with BC Corrections that he worked alongside and interacted with members of BC Sheriff Services.

“I noticed a lot of teamwork and professionalism amongst the sheriffs. And sheriffs really have a good reputation among the law enforcement community.” read more »