Tag Archives: Aboriginal

Law Enforcement Studies Diploma Police Academy

Officer aims to draw on own experience to be role model and help others

Just as she was once made to feel safe by police officers in her time of need, Const. Shauntelle Nichols wants to help others the same way. A graduate of JIBC’s Law Enforcement Studies Diploma program she is now an officer with the Saanich Police Department. (Story and photo by Wanda Chow)

 

When Shauntelle Nichols needed help, the police were there for her. Today she’s a police officer herself, ready to be there for others in need.

For the last several years, Shauntelle has drawn on her experience of officers helping make her feel safe to motivate and inspire her in her studies and efforts to be hired by a local police department.

“Because really, that’s what policing is. You’re at your worst day, somebody’s coming to help you. That’s what’s inspiring to me. I want to be that person [to make others feel safe]. And I see a lot of women, Aboriginal women, Aboriginal youth, in stressful and horrible relationships. They don’t know how to get out and sometimes all it takes is somebody listening, being supportive and being strong for you and guiding you in the right direction.”

It wasn’t long before her personal experience pointed her in the direction of the Justice Institute of British Columbia (JIBC) where she applied to the Law Enforcement Studies Diploma (LESD) program.

“I remember the day I got my acceptance letter I cried my eyes out because I was so happy to be going to this program. It’s the top public safety institution in BC. It’s well known and I knew that if I got in here and I worked as hard as I could it would give me a strong, strong reference to apply to police departments.”

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Justice Institute of British Columbia Office of Indigenization

Planning for a future through education

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Malcolm Stewart, of the Nisga’a Nation, is a student in the Justice and Public Safety Certificate program at JIBC. Here he works on an essay in JIBC’s Aboriginal Gathering Place as a house post by Nisga’a artist Mike Dangeli looks on. (Story and photo by Wanda Chow)

 

Malcolm Stewart has always wanted to further his education. Ironically, it took an injury to give him the opportunity.

Malcolm, 47, hails from the Nisga’a Nation in northwestern BC. He’s spent the past 20 years working in the construction industry as a carpenter, and most recently as a construction safety officer/occupational first aid attendant at local highrise projects.

Restless while on medical Employment Insurance, off work due to an injury, he sought a way to be constructive with his time.

It was on Facebook where he learned of Justice Institute of British Columbia’s (JIBC) Justice and Public Safety Certificate program for Aboriginal learners which started in January 2016. Run in conjunction with Native Education College, it concludes in April 2017.

The program, from tuition to textbooks, is fully funded by government through the BC Ministry of Advanced Education, the Employment Services and Supports (ESS) stream of the Canada-BC Job Fund Agreement, and Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada. To be eligible, students must identify as being of First Nation, Metis or Inuit heritage and have an interest in justice and public safety careers.

“Going back to school has always been on my mind but financially it was just not viable for me,” Malcolm said.

Then the opportunity for free post-secondary education at JIBC came up and he jumped at it. read more »

Justice Institute of British Columbia Office of Indigenization

Justice and public safety program for Aboriginal students a lifesaver

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Jessie Jensen is a student in the Justice and Public Safety Certificate program. In addition to fuelling her dream of becoming an RCMP officer, the CPR training in the First Responder course already helped her save a life. (Story and photo by Wanda Chow)

 

When Jessie Jensen enrolled in a new program at the Justice Institute of British Columbia (JIBC), she saw it as a way to gain new skills and take steps toward a new career.

She never dreamed her courses would help her save another life so soon.

Jessie, 20, lives with her parents who care for a six-month-old foster baby. Recently, the infant girl had a fever that spiked before she suddenly stopped breathing.

Despite having only just completed her JIBC First Responder course, it was Jessie who performed CPR and got the baby breathing again before paramedics arrived.

“You don’t think you’re going to use these things right away,” she said of the course, just days after the incident. “It was the scariest moment of my life.”

The First Responder course is part of JIBC’s Justice and Public Safety Certificate program for Aboriginal learners which started in January 2016 in conjunction with Native Education College (NEC). The program, from tuition to textbooks, is fully funded by government through the BC Ministry of Advanced Education, the Employment Services and Supports (ESS) stream of the Canada-BC Job Fund Agreement, and Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada. To be eligible, students must identify as being of First Nation, Metis or Inuit heritage and have an interest in justice and public safety careers. read more »