Category Archives: Justice Institute of British Columbia

Justice Institute of British Columbia Law Enforcement Studies Diploma

LESD grad makes a difference drawing on refugee experience

Two years after graduating from JIBC, Mansoor Sahak was hired as an RCMP officer, a role he hopes will help him to give back to Canada for taking in his family as refugees.

 

Mansoor Sahak hasn’t wasted any time in pursuing his goal of giving back to Canada as a police officer.

Two years after graduating with a Law Enforcement Studies Diploma (LESD) at the Justice Institute of British Columbia (JIBC), he was hired by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) in early 2017. Then in his first year as a general duty officer with North Vancouver RCMP, he took 42 impaired drivers off the road, and was recognized as a member of “Alexa’s Team.”

The honour is named after four-year-old Alexa Middelaer who was killed by a drunk driver in 2008. It is awarded to police officers in BC who make an extraordinary contribution to reducing the number of impaired drivers on the province’s roads.

Mansoor believes the lessons and skills he gained from the LESD program at JIBC was a great foundation in his pursuit for a law enforcement career, along with his experience as an RCMP auxiliary and a bylaw officer, volunteering with the Vancouver Police Department, and being part of police judo at JIBC.

He also had a deeper purpose in his career choice. It all comes back to his family’s experience as refugees, and his desire to give back to the country that took them in. read more »

Emergency Management Division Justice Institute of British Columbia School of Public Safety

JIBC education helps grad pursue a career in emergency management

Kevin Skrepnek, the chief fire information officer for the BC Wildfire Service, recently completed a Certificate in Emergency Management at JIBC to get a better understanding of the industry for which he’s now a spokesperson. 

 

For several years now, Kevin Skrepnek has been the face of the BC Wildfire Service during the summer wildfire season. As chief fire information officer, he serves as the spokesperson for the service ensuring the public receives critical safety information when they need it most, when forest fires start bearing down on homes and people are forced to evacuate.

Armed with a diploma in public relations from Kwantlen Polytechnic University, Kevin had the background for his particular line of work. But being new to the world of emergency management, he wanted to get a better understanding of the industry he was now a visible part of.

When Kevin decided to go back to school for a Certificate in Emergency Management, he chose the program at the Justice Institute of British Columbia (JIBC).

“I found the courses refreshingly practical, and very hands on. Instructors came with significant real-world experience, which was a huge asset as a learner,” he said. “The program is very flexible, which is great for working professionals looking to expand their skillset.”

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Fire & Safety Division Fire Fighting Technologies Certificate Justice Institute of British Columbia School of Public Safety

JIBC firefighting grads gain a global perspective studying in the UK

JIBC Fire Fighting Technologies Certificate (FFTC) graduates Nick Cirillo and Rorie Moir recently arrived at The Fire Service College in the UK to participate in a special opportunity to study abroad for two weeks and gain invaluable international firefighter training experience.

This new opportunity for JIBC FFTC students is part of the Fire Protection in the Global Community course and is made possible through funding from the Irving K. Barber One World Scholarship administered by the Victoria Foundation, and with additional support from The Justice Institute of British Columbia Foundation.

Check back often to see their latest updates below about their learning experience at one of the largest firefighter training schools in the world:

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Fire & Safety Division Fire Fighting Technologies Certificate Justice Institute of British Columbia School of Public Safety

Part-time JIBC firefighter training program helps grad pursue her dream career

Chantal MacLeod didn’t hesitate to enroll in the part-time offering of JIBC’s Fire Fighting Technologies Certificate program which allowed her to continue working full-time while pursuing her dream of a firefighting career. (Photo by Jesse Erlich)

 

Chantal MacLeod has always been interested in pursuing a career in firefighting but found it difficult to take time off work to do so.

For several years, Chantal has worked full time as a lifeguard and swim instructor at a local community centre. The job has given her the opportunity to use her first aid skills and to work in an environment that fosters teamwork.

She conducted extensive research on firefighting schools, which included attending one of the Justice Institute of British Columbia’s (JIBC) Fire Fighting Workshops for Women supported by The JIBC Foundation and donor Jessica Roberts. Participants got to put on full turnout gear and try their hand at activities including raising ladders, hose handling, a dummy drag and climbing stairs while wearing self-contained breathing apparatus.

“I was so glad that I spent that rainy Saturday up at JIBC, it sparked a new, more intense interest and reaffirmed my passion to be part of the fire service,” Chantal said. “As a woman, I felt it was extremely helpful to have an info session for women with amazing female training officers.”

Following the info session she decided JIBC’s Fire Fighting Technologies Certificate (FFTC) program was the right fit for her. When she learned it was being offered as a part-time program, she jumped at the chance and enrolled in the first cohort.
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Centre for Professional Health Education Justice Institute of British Columbia School of Health, Community & Social Justice

Community Care Licensing grad finds career direction through JIBC program

JIBC’s Community Care Licensing program helped direct Helen Wale to a career where she can make a difference through her passion for quality care for adults with developmental disabilities.

 

After completing a university degree, Helen Wale found entry-level government jobs hard to come by.

Thanks to the Advanced Specialty Certificate in Community Care Licensing program at the Justice Institute of British Columbia (JIBC), she was able to focus her career direction and find a role as a quality service analyst with Community Living BC (CLBC).

A provincial Crown agency, CLBC funds day programs, individualized supports, and residential supports, including licensed group homes, for adults with developmental disabilities. In her role as quality service analyst, Helen monitors the government-funded services and conducts site visits similar to the community care facility inspections carried out by licensing officers. She also negotiates and reviews contracts with the service providers.

Helen’s interest in the work stemmed from her experience during and after her bachelor degree studies at the University of Victoria when she worked as a registered care aide in group homes for adults with developmental disabilities.

“While I worked through my degree I saw a lot of examples in group homes of wonderful care and some examples of care that weren’t wonderful. I developed passion for quality assurance and quality care.”

When she researched career options, Helen discovered and enrolled in JIBC’s Advanced Specialty Certificate in Community Care Licensing program, the only program of its kind in Canada. read more »

Justice & Public Safety Division Justice Institute of British Columbia Law Enforcement Studies Diploma School of Criminal Justice & Security

JIBC law enforcement studies helps grad keep communities safe

Courtney Lee has always wanted to work with dogs. After graduating from JIBC’s Law Enforcement Studies Diploma program, she was hired by Securiguard as a dog handler for Diesel, who specializes in explosives detection, at YVR. 

 

Courtney Lee has always loved animals, and dogs in particular. So when she became interested in pursuing a career in law enforcement, her goal of becoming a dog handler seemed a natural fit.

Courtney currently works for Securiguard at Vancouver International Airport as a handler for her canine partner, Diesel, who specializes in explosives detection.

She’s well on her way to achieving the career path of her dreams and she says it’s all thanks to the Justice Institute of British Columbia (JIBC), where she graduated from the Law Enforcement Studies Diploma (LESD) program.

“I decided to take JIBC’s LESD program because it was the only program I could find that offered more of a hands-on approach, and I thought that it would be valuable life experience,” Courtney said.

“I liked the program because it was a different approach to learning. The instructors were mostly ex-law enforcement officers and were able to offer hands-on experience. The courses were truly unique and offered information that students would not normally get, as well as experiences that no other schools offered, like the defensive driving course, applied law, and many others.”

It was at a career fair at JIBC where she learned about the career opportunities available at Securiguard. She had no prior experience working in the security industry but spent time volunteering with the company’s K-9 unit on its training days. The company hired her and eventually she was assigned to the K-9 unit and teamed up with Diesel.

 

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Centre for Counselling & Community Safety Justice Institute of British Columbia School of Health, Community & Social Justice

Be the one rebuilding lives


Lana Fox’s peers and colleagues were suffering from the trauma of losing clients from the Downtown Eastside to the opioid overdose crisis. Thanks to JIBC’s Critical Incident Stress Management program, she learned how to help. (Story by Wanda Chow / Photo by Jimmy Jeong)

 

Lana Fox was working at the Portland Hotel Society in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside when she noticed her peers and colleagues were suffering.

Her role involved supporting clients with mental health and addictions issues through housing, safe injection and other programs. But before the opioid overdose epidemic made national news headlines and was declared a public health emergency, there was already an obvious change.

“I saw a definitive increase in the trauma being suffered by my peers,” Lana said. “They were attending significantly more overdoses and having increased negative outcomes. Our tenants and program participants were dying at an alarming rate.”

Wanting to help support her colleagues and community, she enrolled in the Critical Incident Stress Management Certificate (CISM) program at the Justice Institute of British Columbia (JIBC).

She found all of her courses were applicable to life in general, citing emergency preparedness as one area she learned new tools that will prove useful one day. The program included simulated debriefings conducted with professional actors to help students practice what they learned.

“Throughout the coursework, it was very easy to imagine how the practice could be applied to my workplace.”

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Health Sciences Division Justice Institute of British Columbia Paramedic Academy School of Health, Community & Social Justice

Be the one saving lives

August 10, 2016 - Vancouver, BC - Photos for JIBC. Photos by Jimmy Jeong
Matt Anderson is keen to be able to use his JIBC paramedic training to serve his remote Central BC community. He also hopes to eventually train others to help provide a basic level of medical care for the town’s 800 residents. (Story by Wanda Chow / Photo by Jimmy Jeong)

 

Just a week after Matt Anderson successfully completed his paramedic licensing exam he was practically bursting to talk about the possibilities that come with his training at the Justice Institute of British Columbia (JIBC).

After all, as the lone certified paramedic in Moricetown, a Wet’suwet’en village in Central BC halfway between Smithers and Hazelton, he and a licenced Emergency Medical Responder (EMR) were to be the  main regular providers of health care to the approximately 800 residents.

It was yet another role in the community for Matt, who is also a high school teacher for at-risk youth, the town’s driving instructor, one of 12 members of its volunteer fire department, and one of only two certified EMRs.

As a first responder, he said, “It’s 24/7. I have a radio on me and I just go when I’m called.”

The town’s fire chief asked him to become the fire department’s “medical guy” because no one else wanted to do it. In a First Nations community, the close knit nature and location can often result in Indigenous firefighters and first responders attending to emergencies involving their own families. This can lead to some uncomfortable situations, unique to a small community.  Matt, however, is one of the few non-Indigenous residents, from a family that’s called Moricetown home for almost 40 years. 

He agreed to the role, was trained in Occupational First Aid Level 1 and enjoyed it so much he started thinking about becoming a paramedic. He attended JIBC to get his EMR certification and eventually community leaders agreed they wanted him to pursue further training.

His school supervisor and the fire chief both gave him leaves of absence so he could go through the eight-month process of training for the Primary Care Paramedic Certificate at JIBC’s Chilliwack campus and completing the licensing requirements; the Moricetown Volunteer Fire Department and the Kyah Wiget Education Society he works for helped cover some of the costs; and the Moricetown Band is also behind him.

The JIBC training was everything he’d hoped.

“I just loved it. I ate that program up. I loved the instructors. The instructors in Chilliwack are phenomenal and I hear that from everyone. Really great course.” read more »