Author Archives: rchu

JIBC law enforcement degree opens doors for recent grad

JIBC’s Bachelor of Law Enforcement Studies program helps recent-graduate Louise Lathey combine her passion for helping animals with her desire to make a difference in her community. (Story by Wanda Chow)

 

Louise Lathey always knew she wanted to make a difference. She always figured she would accomplish that through a front-line role in policing or paramedicine.

In preparation for that, she completed several programs at the Justice Institute of British Columbia (JIBC), from the Emergency Medical Responder Certificate, and Bylaw Compliance, Enforcement and Investigative Skills course, to the Investigation & Enforcement Skills Certificate and Law Enforcement Studies Diploma (LESD).

Louise had applied for a policing job after her first year of LESD, but was told to reapply after gaining more experience in a related role. It was while searching for such a role that she tapped into her longtime love of animals. She landed a job at the BC SPCA as an on-call night emergency officer.

“This job was intense and incredibly rewarding. I responded to calls of sick or injured domestic and wild animals, and had to rescue and transport these animals to vet clinics, wildlife facilities or wherever else they needed to go. Thanks to this position I learned that skunks love peanut butter and raccoons are not as cute as they look.”

She began to explore the field of animal law. She transitioned into the BC SPCA’s cruelty investigations department, became a Special Provincial Constable doing cruelty investigations, worked in the Vancouver SPCA animal shelter as an animal care attendant, and had a chance to work in shelter management.

“At this point I think I had taken a break from school as I was sort of re-evaluating my career path. This is when I started realizing that the law enforcement world was bigger than just policing.”

Louise returned to JIBC to finish the LESD program and continued her studies to complete the Bachelor of Law Enforcement Studies (BLES). read more »

Intelligence Matters

In the age of big data, the growing field of intelligence analysis can help businesses discover trends to protect themselves and boost organizational efficiency (Story by Evan Duggan, originally published in the 2017 Right Course Magazine published by BIV Media Group)


When Jennifer Johnstone first started out in the 1990s as an intelligence analysis for the Canadian Border Services Agency, the biggest challenge of the job was gathering enough data to build a sound investigation. “That’s on the case anymore,” says Johnstone, principal of JJ Analytics and Consulting and an instructor for the Justice Institute of British Columbia (JIBC) intelligence analysis program.

“When I first started, the challenge was finding enough data,” says Johnstone. “You would have a task or a problem to solve, and the real challenge was collecting the information to solve that problem. Now we have so much data it’s overwhelming.”

An estimated 2.5 billion gigabytes of data is generated around the world each day by search engines, social media sites, e-commerce companies and a plethora of other generators. A lot of that data remains available online and could be very harmful if grasped by the wrong hands.

While harnessing and understanding data is an important part of solving crimes and busting fraud schemes that steal identities and drain bank accounts, it’s also useful for organizations proactively looking to gain insights to mitigate risks in their business.

To these ends, the JIBC provides two graduate certificate programs that teach analysts how to sift through billions of bytes of data and convert it into valuable reports that not only help crime busters, but also boost organizational efficiency. read more »

JIBC staff and faculty gain lifelong learning opportunities working with Aboriginal students

2016 NAD CollageAn Aboriginal hoop dancer performs at National Aboriginal Day celebrations held at the Justice Institute of British Columbia recently. JIBC staff and faculty marked the occasion by recounting personal and professional lessons they learned from working with Aboriginal students and communities. (Photos by Richard Chu / Story by Wanda Chow)

 

When it comes to working with Aboriginal students and communities, staff and faculty at Justice Institute of British Columbia (JIBC) find the lessons go both ways.

That was the common theme among speakers at this year’s National Aboriginal Day event held June 21 in JIBC’s recently-opened Aboriginal Gathering Place at the New Westminster Campus.

“National Aboriginal Day is always a special occasion at JIBC,” said Dr. Jeffrey Schiffer, Director of the Office of Indigenization. “This year, we decided it was a great opportunity to share some of the ways the education we’re providing is helping to build capacity within Aboriginal communities, and strengthen relationships in the spirit of truth and reconciliation.”

Bridget Malcom, JIBC’s Aboriginal Student Recruiter & Advisor, shared her story of how her work at the Institute has put her in touch with her own Aboriginal heritage. Growing up, she lived with her father in New Westminster, with little awareness of her mother’s Aboriginal culture. After working at JIBC planning events and ceremonies with local First Nations and their Elders as part of her role, Malcom said there’s been no shortage of opportunities to learn more about her Aboriginal roots. She notes that exposure to her cultural heritage has only enhanced her work and commitment to assist JIBC Aboriginal learners. read more »

JIBC firefighting grad ready to serve in B.C.’s Peace Region

Jayden Ockenden - JIBC Fire Fighting Technologies Certificate Graduate - Class 5 - 2016

Kamloops native Jayden Ockenden has always wanted a career where he could make a difference in someone’s life. He had initially planned to pursue a career in law enforcement. But spending his summers as a wildland firefighter while he studied at SFU helped him discover his true calling as a firefighter.

“I loved the camaraderie, the team work, and knowing that I was doing something meaningful and important,” said Jayden who played on SFU’s football team in his first year. “I couldn’t imagine myself doing anything else after that.”

To realize his career goal, Jayden was encouraged to complete his firefighter training at the Justice Institute of British Columbia (JIBC).

“I was fortunate enough to know a Captain from Kamloops Fire Rescue and was advised to go to JIBC as it’s one of the most prestigious fire academies around,” said Jayden, who was in Class 5 of the new Fire Fighting Technologies Certificate (FFTC) Program. “He was not wrong. JIBC was everything I was hoping for and more.”

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JIBC firefighting grads make a difference in Belize

2016_OneWorldBelize_Collage1-blog-600x300smFive recent JIBC graduates of the Fire Fighting Technologies Certificate Program provided firefighter training in Belize earlier this year (Story by Richard Chu).

 

Each year, JIBC’s firefighting graduates have an opportunity to apply for a special course where they travel overseas to support basic firefighter training in a developing country.

This year, five students had the opportunity to travel to Belize on a three-week deployment that saw them travel across the country to visit each of the country’s 17 local fire halls, train local firefighters, and get involved in the community.

This special program is made possible with support from the Fire Rescue International Training Association (FRITA) and student scholarships from the Irving K. Barber One World International Scholarship administered by the Victoria Foundation with additional support from JIBC.

For each of this year’s One World Scholarship recipients, the experience was an eye-opening one that made a significant impression in their lives.

“We traveled to all the different fire halls, and we quickly realized that while they don’t have all the equipment that we have at home, they have the same passion that firefighters here have: they want to go to work and are proud of being a firefighter,” said Cody DiSalvo, one of this year’s One World students who was among the other JIBC graduates who shared their experience in a presentation at the New Westminster Campus in April. “It inspired all of us, to be proud about what we were doing. We had a great experience and learned a lot.”

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Top reasons future firefighters complete their training at JIBC

2016_04APR_FFTC_Collage2-650x300

Students who are accepted into JIBC’s Fire Fighting Technologies Certificate (FFTC) program come with varying degrees of knowledge and experience with essential firefighting skills. But a remarkable transformation occurs with every graduate who completes the program.

“By the end of the FFTC program, each graduate has become exceptionally proficient with the skills they need to earn their NFPA [National Fire Protection Association] qualifications,” said Richard White, a retired assistant fire chief and JIBC’s Coordinator of Firefighter Programs. “They are ready to serve as professional firefighters in the community.”

Just how effective the program prepares JIBC grads was illustrated in the fall of 2015, when a group of FFTC students, a few days away from completing their hands-on training, helped save the life of a teenager involved in a major motor vehicle crash in Maple Ridge.

“The training really paid off,” said Lance Masocol, from FFTC Class 3. “We got on scene and we didn’t even have to think about what we needed to do; we just knew what we had to do. That’s one of the things I gained going through the program.”

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JIBC law enforcement degree helps aspiring police officers stand out

2016_lacite_students1-edited2b_rc-650x300Charles Payette, Sabastien Therrien, and Sabastien Houle are among graduates from Ontario’s largest French-language college completing their Bachelor’s degree at JIBC (Photo & story by Richard Chu)

 

Charles Payette decided to move across the country to complete JIBC’s Bachelor of Law Enforcement Studies (BLES) program. He wasn’t the only one.

Last fall, four graduates from Ontario’s largest French-language college, La Cité collégiale, moved to New Westminster from their hometowns in Quebec to continue their education at JIBC. They first heard about the BLES program from their Dean at La Cité when JIBC and La Cité signed a Memorandum of Understanding to expand educational opportunities for students. As graduates of La Cité’s applied Police Foundations Diploma (Techniques des Services Policiers), each student was interested in continuing their education with a unique program that would help them stand out in the highly competitive law enforcement recruitment process.

“A lot of students go into criminology,” said Charles. “But this is different. Rather than look like all the other police applicants, I can say I have a degree from the Justice Institute of British Columbia in law enforcement studies. It’s not something a lot of other applicants will have.”

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JIBC law enforcement degree a vital stepping stone for a meaningful career

Ramandeep - BLES student successfully being recruited into law enforcement with his education from the Bachelor of Law Enforcement Studies programJIBC’s Bachelor of Law Enforcement Studies Program is helping students like Ramandeep realize their professional goals (Photo & story by Richard Chu)

 

The Bachelor of Law Enforcement Studies (BLES) program has served as a rewarding stepping stone to meaningful careers in public safety.

Ramandeep Randhawa is a fourth-year BLES student at the JIBC New Westminster Campus, who currently serves as a Bylaw Enforcement Officer for the City of North Vancouver and the City of New Westminster. He has also been hired by the Vancouver Police Department as a Special Municipal Constable.

“I’m extremely satisfied to have continued my education and pursue a bachelor’s degree,” said Ramandeep, who began his post-secondary education at JIBC by completing the Law Enforcement Studies Diploma. read more »